MARIA CLARA


The Western European ways of life spread throughout the islands of the Philippines, where Spain had much contact. This suite showcases the Spanish influence in music, dance, dress, and societal customs introduced by the Spaniards. These dances are named in honor of the legendary Maria Clara, the main female character of Jose Rizal’s book, Noli Me Tangere. Maria Clara symbolizes the grace and beauty of the Filipina woman.

CHOTIS

Chotis was a ballroom dance during the Spanish regime. This Filipinized version of the Chotis features young ladies as they flirtatiously sway hats in waltz tempo.

PASO DOBLE

Paso doble means double step. The dance is based on the movements of a bullfighter in the ring. A señorita flirtatiously wields her fan, using it to stress a point.

JOTA CAGAYANA

This jota shows the European fashion styles during the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 in the Cagayan province. It comes from the 16th century courtship dance, Canaries, which is said to be the “parent of the Jota.”

PRINSESA NG KUMINTANG

A dance about the pursuit of a very beautiful woman, made popular by the Batanggenyos through a song composed by Francisco Buencamino of Bulacan

CARINOSA

A courtship dance that originated in Panay but was popularized in Rapu-Rapu, Albay, the Cariñosa, or “Amiable,” depicts a man courting a woman while being restricted from touching her. During the old times, it was scandalous for a man to touch even the fingertips of a lady. The representation of such is seen in the dance, in which a demure lady is protecting herself from the man using a scented fan and a handkerchief, as if playing hide-and-seek.

JOTA INTRAMURENA

This jota from Intramuros, danced to the banduria and guitar while accompanied by the clicking of bamboo castanets, showcases the many ways of using the Manton de Manila, or shawl.

JOTA MANILEÑA

This is Manila’s version of the famous jota of Spain with its typical clicking of castanets bearing a Spanish influence.

PANDERETAS

From Tanza, Iloilo, this dance is named for the tambourines that the women carry, featuring Iberian styles of dancing in complicated zapateado footwork and castanets.

Paragua
Abaruray

Photos:

 Photo: Tak3n Photograpy | This is it Photograpy

Resource: Ramon Obusan Folkloric Group